Easy Homemade Lorne Sausage Recipe

Is it Lorne Sausage or Square Sausage? We asked the members on our Scottish Scran Facebook and there was much debate, alongside all sorts of extra names too!

Slice” or “Sliced“, “Square Slice” or “Flat Sausage” or our new favourite, “Squasage”, were a few of the other suggestions as well. But whatever name you decide to go with, this simple but tasty meat square is a Scottish classic and is perfect packed inside a morning roll or as part of a full Scottish breakfast.

Scottish Square Sausage Lorne Sausage Recipe

Unlike a traditional sausage, a Scottish square sausage has no casing which means it’s easy to make at home, hence why we thought it was about time we came up with our own Lorne sausage recipe.

For the rest of the recipe we’ll most refer to it as Lorne or Lorne sausage, since that seemed to be the most popular, but rest assured we’re well aware of all its wonderful names!

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Scottish Square Sausage Lorne Sausage Recipe

Where does Lorne Sausage come from?

The exact origins of Lorne sausage, like many traditional Scottish foods, is unclear. It’s likely it was in the latter 19th century when metal tins also became more popular, and it would have been cheaper to shape the sausage in these than in a casing.

Why is it called Lorne Sausage?

Of course, there is contention about the origins of the name “Lorne Sausage” as well. A popular story is that it was because of Glaswegian comedian Tommy Lorne, who made jokes about square sausages looking a bit like doormats. However, there is evidence of advertisements from butchers for “Lorne Sausage” at least 6 years before Tommy Lorne was even more.

More likely is that it was named for the extinct district of Lorne, which was part of the what is now known as Argyll and Bute, although there is no direct evidence for this either.

Another option is that is was named for the Marquess of Lorne, which was the name given to the son of the Duke of Argyll. The Marquess of Lorne in the late 19th century was well-known for marrying one of Queen Victoria’s daughters, so it’s possible for some reason the sausage was named for him. I mean, who doesn’t want a sausage named after them?!

The truth is we’ll never know, but however it happened the name has stuck in many households and shops across Scotland.

So let’s get to making our own Lorne, or Square Sausage Recipe then!

Things you’ll need to make this Lorne Sausage Recipe

  • Loaf tin to pack it into – we have one like this
  • Cling Film or Beeswax wrap – we used cling film as we had some in our draw but you could use a beeswax wrap to stop it sticking to the tin as well

Ingredients for this Homemade Lorne Sausage Recipe

  • 450g (1lb) minced beef
  • 450g (1lb) minced pork
  • 250g (1.5 cups) breadcrumbs (not fresh)
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp salt ( add to taste)
  • 1.5 tsp coriander
  • 0.5 tsp nutmeg
  • 0.5 tsp mace
  • 120ml (0.5 cups) cold water
Scottish Square Sausage Lorne Sausage Recipe

Using the right meat

You need to use meat that has a high percentage of fat, otherwise the sausage will be dry. Often these sausages shrink a lot when cooked as the fat content is high! We used meat that was 20% fat and would say this should be a minimum.

Breadcrumbs or Rusk?

Using breadcrumbs or rusks also means the sausage won’t be dry and chewy. They help to absorb moisture. We used natural breadcrumbs in our Lorne sausage recipe, but you could also use rusk.

Rusk is a cereal ingredient made of wheat flour versus breadcrumbs which is dried bread. It’s often used to bulk up sausages and used when a large number of sausages are being prepared. We found breadcrumbs to be just as good if not better, but you can use either.

Scottish Square Sausage Lorne Sausage Recipe

How to make Lorne Sausage – Step by step method

Line your loaf tin, or whatever you’re using to make the square sausage, with clingfilm, with enough hanging over the edges to wrap over the opening once you’ve put the sausage meat in it.

Add all the ingredients to a bowl and use your hands to throughly combine.

Squash the sausage meat into the loaf tin as densely as possible. If you have any left over you can set aside to make meat patties out of it!

Wrap the clingfilm over the top so it’s fully covered and place in the freezer for 2 hours, or until firm enough to slice. Note, you should not use pre-frozen meat for this recipe as meat should only be frozen and thawed once. Alternatively, leave in the refrigerator for 24 hours until it is firm.

Remove the sausage from the tin using the clingfilm to lift it out and then cut into 1cm slices.

You can use immediately, put in the fridge to be used within the next 2 days, or put pieces of baking paper between slices and place them in a container to fully freeze and pull out to use as you wish.

Cook in a fry pan for a few minutes each slide or grill and then serve in a morning roll with your choice or sauce, as part of a full Scottish breakfast, or even in your Stovies!

Scottish Square Sausage Lorne Sausage Recipe
Yield: 12

Easy Homemade Lorne Sausage Recipe

Scottish Square Sausage Lorne Sausage Recipe

This simple but tasty meat square is a Scottish classic and is perfect packed inside a morning roll or as part of a full Scottish breakfast

Unlike a traditional sausage, a Scottish square sausage has no casing which means it’s easy to make at home, hence why we thought it was about time we came up with our own Lorne sausage recipe.

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cool Time 3 hours
Total Time 3 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 450g (1lb) minced beef
  • 450g (1lb) minced pork
  • 250g (1.5 cups) breadcrumbs (not fresh)
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp salt ( add to taste)
  • 1.5 tsp coriander
  • 0.5 tsp nutmeg
  • 0.5 tsp mace
  • 120ml (1/2 cup) cold water

Instructions

  1. Line your loaf tin, or whatever you’re using to make the square sausage, with clingfilm, with enough hanging over the edges to wrap over the opening once you’ve put the sausage meat in it.
  2. Add all the ingredients to a bowl and use your hands to thoroughly combine.
  3. Squash the sausage meat into the loaf tin as densely as possible. If you have any leftover you can set aside to make meat patties out of it!
  4. Wrap the clingfilm over the top so it’s fully covered and place in the freezer for 2 hours, or until firm enough to slice.* Alternatively, leave it in the refrigerator for 24 hours until it is firm.
  5. Remove the sausage from the tin using the clingfilm to lift it out and then cut into 1cm slices.
  6. You can use it immediately, put it in the fridge to be used within the next 2 days, or put pieces of baking paper between slices and place them in a container to fully freeze and pull out to use as you wish.
  7. Cook in a frying pan for a few minutes each slide or grill and then serve in a morning roll with your choice of sauce, or as part of a full Scottish breakfast!

Notes

*Note: You should not use pre-frozen meat for this recipe as meat should only be frozen and thawed once.

Using High Fat Meat

You need to use meat that has a high percentage of fat, otherwise the sausage will be dry. Often these sausages shrink a lot when cooked as the fat content is high! We used meat that was 20% fat and would say this should be a minimum.

Using Breadcrumbs or Rusk

Using breadcrumbs or rusks also means the sausage won’t be dry and chewy. They help to absorb moisture. We used natural breadcrumbs in our Lorne sausage recipe, but you could also use rusk.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

12

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 276Total Fat: 13gSaturated Fat: 5gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 7gCholesterol: 66mgSodium: 209mgCarbohydrates: 15gFiber: 1gSugar: 1gProtein: 23g

11 thoughts on “Easy Homemade Lorne Sausage Recipe”

    • That’s a tough one. It depends on what you’re able to find online and locally of course. When you slice your sausage you could always cut it square and use the cut off pieces in stovies?

      Reply
    • I hate coriander too, and I honestly couldn’t taste it in our recipe because it blends nicely with the rest of the ingredients. By all means leave it out to avoid disappointment and then maybe experiment with other spices once you’ve tasted it. – Phil

      Reply
    • Thanks for the comment Scott, Lorne can be beef as you say or a mix of pork and beef or even just pork, if you like. The choice is down to you.
      Cheers,
      Phil & Sonja

      Reply
    • Hi Wendy,
      It could be a number of things, the meat needs to be very tightly packed in and frozen long enough. Another stumbling block we found was using mince with a high enough fat content or trying to cut the slices too thinly.

      Reply

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